Food Additives Part 1: An Examination of What We Eat

By: Theresa Klepper
Edited by: Sharon E. Chin

“[The] FDA is responsible for protecting and promoting public health by, among other things, ensuring that the nation’s food supply for human and animal consumption is safe, sanitary, wholesome and properly labeled ”(2).

Picture of 2 week old cappuccino remains with syrup

Can we trust what we eat?
Our faith in the well-being of the food we eat sits on the shoulders of the FDA; it’s their job to make sure we can trust what we consume. Yet are the American people healthy? When we consider what the American people think they’re eating compared with what people are actually eating, we may want to ruminate a bit more before choosing what to munch on.

Today’s eatables often contain many harmful and unnecessary additives. For the inquisitive mind, therein lies the doubt: what am I really buying, consuming, and putting into my body? Am I just eating chicken, or am I getting more than what I bargained for? The thought of not knowing if food is safe casts doubt on the current strength of regulations on additives.

Let’s review these past case studies of food additives. In Part Two of this paper, we will discuss their availability, and examine who should be held accountable for their wide spread popularity….

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#Additives, #Fda, #Food, #Health, #PublicHealth, #Research

Tis’ the Season to be Jolly & Sober

As we all know, the holiday season brings joy to some and anxiety to others.  It is therefore not unexpected that at this time of year there is an increased feeling of loneliness for those who are alone, a heightened sense of hopelessness for those who have depression, and an increased challenge by the temptations of the season for those who are faced with the disease of addiction. “Tis’ the season to be jolly.  Fa la la la la, la la la la.”  Really?  So during a time when we are faced with the senseless deaths of fellow citizens for minor crimes and the rising up of voices, which reminds us of the disparity that existed between the discriminatory penalties imposed for crack cocaine versus powder cocaine, I thought I would share a few stories….

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#Abuse, #Addiction, #Alcohol, #Health, #Holidays, #MentalHealth

Hundreds of Orgs Ask for Extension of Federal Program for Young Mothers

Written by John Kelly

Senate and House leadership received a letter today, signed by 750 organizations and local politicians, urging them to maintain a federal program meant to assist struggling young mothers and mothers-to-be.

The Home Visiting Coalition asked leaders in the letter to fund the ……

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#Atrisk, #Child, #ChildWelfare, #Children, #Education, #Federal, #Health, #House, #Research

Dressember: A Movement

Blythe Hill is Founder of the Dressember movement. Blythe has a background in writing and received her MA from Cal State Fullerton. Having worked on editorials for a local magazine, she currently works for a fashion forecasting company in Culver City.

What inspired you to create the Dressember movement?
In 2009, I wanted to do something which would make me feel challenged. That’s when the thought of a style challenge came to mind. It occurred to me to wear a dress every day for a month. The next full month coming up was December and being a lover of word play and puns, I called the style challenge “Dressember.”
 
How was this movement able to grow to the extent it has in such a relative short time?
At the time I started it, I thought Dressember would be a one-time event. But a lot of my friends took notice of what I did and wanted to join in with me for the following year. So, it grew. In 2011, I felt there was something missing. With the Movember movement, where men are encouraged to grow mustaches in November, awareness and money is raised to combat prostate and testicular cancer and men’s health issues.

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#Health, #HumanTrafficking, #WomensRights

Resource Alert: New Trauma Tool Helps Narrow The Gap Between Research and Practice

Trauma is pervasive. We know that anyone can experience trauma, regardless of age, race, gender or socio-economic status. Over the past two to three decades we have learned a lot about trauma – its immediate and long-term impact but also what treatments and organizational practices are effective for helping individuals heal and build resilience.

In a widespread effort to become more trauma-informed, all of us need to take advantage of existing research, knowledge, practices, and approaches that have already shown to be effective in addressing trauma. To support this effort, JBS International and Georgetown University National Technical Assistance Center for Children’s Mental Health created a free web-based tool entitled “Trauma Informed Care: Perspectives and Resources” that provides insights and resources for anyone wanting to be more trauma-informed. The tool consists of video interviews with lessons learned from individuals and organizations as well as educational documents and comprehensive resources that are updated regularly.

Full Story @ http://sjs.li/10E8Qru
#Abuse, #Health, #MentalHealth, #Policy, #Trauma